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4 Challenges with Leak Detection in the Oil & Gas Industry

The leak detection market growth for the Oil & Gas industry is expected to reach $2.71 billion by 2020, with a CAGR of 7.1 percent between 2015 and 2020. Much of the rapid growth in this industry is attributed to the demand for Oil & Gas companies as they respond to the ever-increasing demands of private and government agencies to be more environmentally responsible. While the leak detection equipment market in the Oil & Gas industry is thriving, and experiencing rapid growth, the Oil & Gas industry admits that they do have several challenges that they are yet to find a comprehensive solution for.

The leak detection market growth for the Oil & Gas industry is expected to reach $2.71 billion by 2020, with a CAGR of 7.1 percent between 2015 and 2020. Much of the rapid growth in this industry is attributed to the demand for Oil & Gas companies as they respond to the ever-increasing demands of private and government agencies to be more environmentally responsible. While the leak detection market in the Oil & Gas industry is thriving, and experiencing rapid growth, the Oil & Gas industry admits that they do have several challenges that they are yet to find a comprehensive solution for.

Simply put, there are certain components of leak detection equipment that are absolutely necessary to minimize health risks and loss, and so far, there is no one system that can carry out these vital tasks.

1. Identification of Leaks

The first, and most vital, step for any leak detection system is the capacity to identify leaks and notify personnel of the leaks. Leak detection and identification is done through the combination of detection hardware and equipment and the software programs that regulate them. The leak threshold is determined by the person in charge of leak protocol — who sets the minimal threshold for decreases in system pressure. When the system reaches the threshold, an alarm is sounded and leak protocol is initiated.

2. The localization of the Leaks

Due to the fact that the systems being run by these companies are massive, it is also necessary for a quality leak detection system to be able to localize the leak, meaning that the detection system will specific exactly where the leak is. Without localization, it would take a lot of man hours and financial resources to locate the leak.

3. Quantifying the Leak

Because varying degrees at which leaks occur, it is necessary for the leak detection system to quantify, in specific numbers, the magnitude of the leak. Have a clear understanding of the size of the leak will help determine response protocol. Obviously, the response to a minor leak will be different than the response for a major leak.

4. Classification of the Leak

It is also necessary to classify the leak. Leaks can be major or minor. They can present a minor or major health risk, or they may not be a health risk at all. The more precisely the leak can be classified the more specific the response.

Currently, there is not one leak detection system that can perform all of the tasks mentioned here, and Oil & Gas companies are finding that combining multiple systems does not necessarily produce the desired results. As the demand for cleaner air continues, these challenges with have to be met with viable solutions.


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May 12, 2016 Category: General Posted by: admin



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